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Resolved What should not be done with SSD drives?

Discussion in 'Windows 10' started by BobbyScot, 2017/06/19.

  1. 2017/06/19
    BobbyScot

    BobbyScot Geek Member Thread Starter

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    Can someone advise me as to what should not be done with SSD drive?
     
  2. 2017/06/19
    retiredlearner

    retiredlearner SuperGeek WindowsBBS Team Member

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    What do you need to know? Most important to note - NEVER Defragment them!!! Windows 10 will set to Optimize SSD's which is the recognized care for SSD's. I Posted in a Thread some 4-5 weeks back "The Do's and Dont's" for SSD's.
     

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  4. 2017/06/20
    BobbyScot

    BobbyScot Geek Member Thread Starter

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    I was made to believe all Hard Drives (internal or external) clean ups where out of question with SSD. An example, CCleaner, you can clean out the entries in the Recycle Bin, but in my case the RB is installed on the SSD. What I was looking for is the steps taken in HD's doesn't apply using an SSD, failure in doing so can damage the SSD. In Disk Management, clean disk, is this a no go area with an SSD? or indeed any other steps? or only as you said Wipe and only use "Delete files and programs". Thanks, Bobby.
     
  5. 2017/06/20
    lj50 Lifetime Subscription

    lj50 SuperGeek WindowsBBS Team Member

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    Why not right click on the Recycle Bin Icon and choose Empty recycle bin and delete the contents from it manually This way you can uncheck Empty Recycle Bin option box in CCleaner and be done with it.
     
    lj50,
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  6. 2017/06/20
    Bill

    Bill SuperGeek WindowsBBS Team Member

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    Who's telling you this nonsense?

    CCleaner is perfectly safe to use on SSDs. I only have SSDs in this system and I use CCleaner regularly. The only thing you should not do is defrag but the later versions of Windows won't let you defrag a SSD - even if you tell it to. In fact, that is why Windows Defragmenter is no longer called Windows Defragmenter. It is now just "Optimize Drives". Windows correctly selects the tasks, depending type of drive it detects.

    You can run a wipe (or CCleaner's Disk Wiper feature) on a SSD but you shouldn't. Not because it is harmful to the SSD but because of the way "wear leveling" works on a SSD, wipe programs are ineffective. That is, a "wipe" does not ensure all previously saved data has been deleted. Instead, use Secure Erase for SSDs.
     
    Bill,
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  7. 2017/06/20
    BobbyScot

    BobbyScot Geek Member Thread Starter

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    Bill thanks for information appreciated. It was given in several magazine read. CCleaner System, can use this again, as I was told not too, with salutation "what is wrong in using a" clean Recycle Bin manually"". I will abide in what you say Bill. I was thinking how on earth do you clean an SSD with out damage.
     
  8. 2017/06/20
    Bill

    Bill SuperGeek WindowsBBS Team Member

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    Sure would like to see those magazine articles - got a link?

    As far as CCleaner or any cleaning program and SSDs, I would not advise running any of them every day, or have them set to clean on every boot - simply because it is just not needed.

    On first generation SSDs where a limited number of writes was a problem, cleaning every day or at every boot might significantly increase aging. But modern SSDs don't have this problem. Well, all drives, regardless of type, have a finite number of writes but with modern SSDs that number is so astronomical, normal users will never reach it. That's why more and more data centers are using SSDs.

    Anyway, run CCleaner every 3 or 4 weeks.

    Now if the CCleaner articles are bashing CCleaner because of its Registry cleaner feature, that's bogus too. While there is an ongoing debate over whether Registry cleaners do any good, there is no evidence CCleaner's feature does harm. I use it on all my system - have for over 10 years and never had a problem. Piriform has been a reputable company for a very long time. If CCleaner was disruptive, it would not continue to be regularly recommended. The only caution I would pose is to never use a Registry cleaner to fix a broken Windows. I use for preventative maintenance - not repairs.
     
    Bill,
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  9. 2017/06/20
    BobbyScot

    BobbyScot Geek Member Thread Starter

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    Perhaps better stop using CCleaner on a daily basis. HP and Microsoft Forums and other Forums have written articles on SSD's over times but I have failed to take dates.
     
  10. 2017/06/21
    lj50 Lifetime Subscription

    lj50 SuperGeek WindowsBBS Team Member

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    There is NOTHING wrong with you manually deleting the contents of the Recycle Bin. It's NOT going to break anything. I do it all the time on my SSDs without any problems.
     
    lj50,
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  11. 2017/06/21
    BobbyScot

    BobbyScot Geek Member Thread Starter

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    Thank you all for help. Now I have better understanding of SSD's. Thanks Bobby.
     
  12. 2017/06/21
    Bill

    Bill SuperGeek WindowsBBS Team Member

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    Yeah, I never heard of that one before either. If it caused problems, Microsoft would not have made it so simple with a right-click option.

    And in terms of wear on the hard drive or SSD, I don't see any difference between manually deleting the contents (emptying) of the Recycle Bin and using Windows Disk Cleanup or CCleaner to empty the Recycle bin. The "action" is the exact same.

    In thinking about it just a tiny bit further, normal house keeping on SSDs involves "wear leveling" where the operating system (in the back ground) moves files around on the SSD to evenly distribute the load (number of reads and writes) to every sector so one spot does not wear out from overuse while another spot is barely used. If the Recycle Bin is allowed to fill up with 100s or even 1000s or files, wear leveling will be moving those files around, causing more reads and write. Regularly emptying the recycle bin will mean no files to move around.

    So by all means, if you are 100% sure there's nothing in there you don't want to recover/undelete, manually delete the contents.

    FTR, before I ever defrag a hard drive or manually scan for malware, I "clean out the clutter" with CCleaner. It is counterproductive to defrag a hard drive with 1000s of temporary Internet files and cookies on the drive. And it is a waste of time to scan those files too.
     

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