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Poll: SSD - performance versus warranty/reliability

Discussion in 'PC Hardware' started by Christer, 2017/11/30.

?

So, which is your choice? Performance or warranty/reliability?

Poll closed Thursday at 15:25.
  1. Samsung 960 EVO (performance)

    1 vote(s)
    20.0%
  2. Samsung 850 PRO (warranty/reliability)

    4 vote(s)
    80.0%
  1. 2017/11/30
    Christer

    Christer Geek Member Staff Thread Starter

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    This is my first attempt at a poll so please, bear with me!

    I have been researching different options to consider for a new build. I'm aware that there are other makes and models but I've selected these two as a comparison.

    Samsung 850 PRO (512 GB)
    Samsung 960 EVO (500 GB)

    In Sweden, these two drives are priced within 5% (850 PRO the more expensive).

    An attempt to get an "average" of differences in performance ended with the 960 EVO as the winner by a factor of 3.2 (times higher performance).

    The 850 PRO has 3.3 times longer warranty (years) or 1.5 times more writes (TBW) and 1.3 times better reliability (MTBF).

    If you've got the time, feel free to expand on your choice!
     
  2. 2017/11/30
    kip777

    kip777 Well-Known Member

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    Either one won't disappoint. I have a EVO 850 in a Asus G751JT purchased together in Feb 2015, use the original platter drive as a storage drive in the 2nd bay.

    Written 16.9TB says drive condition good. Used for DJ/Karaoke, little video editing, email, web surfing, Netflix, some report writing. Nothing too write intensive.

    M.2 vs Sata lll , I'd go with the 960.
     

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  4. 2017/11/30
    ephemarial

    ephemarial Well-Known Member

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    How about tossing in the Samsung 850 EVO 500GB
    Been using many of those (50+) over the last 5 years in both laptops and desktops for personal and business.

    Very happy with the real world performance and have yet to experience a failure – rather surprising
    Of course combine it with a HDD for programs that do terabytes of temporary writing – like blue ray copy programs.

    Goes with my computer philosophy. NEVER EVER buy latest and greatest. Buy last years or the year before.
    Imagine buying an old car at used car prices BUT it’s brand new never used and with the original warranty starting with purchase.
     
  5. 2017/12/01
    Christer

    Christer Geek Member Staff Thread Starter

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    The Samsung 850 EVO (500 GB) is the "base" for my thoughts. If I were to shell out the extra 40% it would cost to get either the 850 PRO or the 960 EVO, which would I choose? Performance or warranty/reliability?
     
  6. 2017/12/01
    PeteC

    PeteC SuperGeek Staff

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    When I built my current desktop almost 3 years ago to the day I opted for the best SSD available at the time, based on reviews, namely the 256GB 850 Pro SATA 6GB/s 2.5" Solid State Drive. This was intended for Windows and programs only - hence only 256 GB of which 134GB is unused and was coupled originally with 2x 2TB WD Black HD's for data and internal backup - a 3rd WD Blue 2TB drive was added recently. The Samsung has not disappointed or caused any issues.

    I would go for the latter, based on my PC usage which is mainly image processing in Photoshop and no requirement for video editing. The performance of SSD's far outweigh that of HD's whatever their specs.
     
  7. 2017/12/01
    Bill

    Bill SuperGeek WindowsBBS Team Member

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    FWIW, I have the the 850 Pro 256GB as my boot and apps drive and the 850 Evo 256GB for my data. Both work great.
     
    Bill,
    #6
  8. 2017/12/01
    Christer

    Christer Geek Member Staff Thread Starter

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    Interesting solution. My current HDD is partitioned in three, Win XP, Win 7 and Data. This is to enable imaging of the system partition(s) only and backing up data using other programs. Using two drives (HDD) to accomplish that has in the past been more expensive, at least where I live. Today, I checked the prices:

    256 GB 850 PRO + 250 GB 850 EVO = SEK 2369 (USD 283) compared to 512 GB 850 PRO = SEK 2469 (USD 295). With that small difference in price, I would probably go for the single 512 GB 850 PRO. The drives have (approximately) the same performance but I would get better warranty with the PRO drive. However, in the case of drive failure (5-10 years from now when the drives are out of warranty) replacing any of the two small drives would be less expensive.
     
  9. 2017/12/01
    Evan Omo

    Evan Omo Computer Support Technician Staff

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    Hi Christer. IMO I would just go with the 850 Pro as it comes with a 10 year warranty as opposed to the 5 year warranty on the SATA EVO model. Plus since the pro model uses the SATA interface, you can easily move it over to another PC if needed as opposed to the M.2 interface that the 960 SSD uses.

    I have a 1 TB 850 EVO SSD in my custom system and its plenty fast for gaming, video streaming and multitasking. If you are curious here are performance benchmarks comparing the 850 EVO and 850 Pro models and there is not very much of a performance difference between the drives, SSD 850 EVO vs. 850 Pro.
     
  10. 2017/12/01
    Christer

    Christer Geek Member Staff Thread Starter

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    Hi Evan,

    The warranty for the 960 is different from the 850. The 960 EVO comes with 3 years (5 for the 850 EVO) and the 960 PRO comes with 5 years (10 for the 850 PRO).

    Since I'm discussing the bootdrive with the operating system, it's not likely to be moved to another computer, at least not without difficulty. If it would actually happen, the "receiving system" probably also has a M.2 interface, don't you think?

    Yes, I've found out that the differences are negligible and what you get from the 850 PRO is longer warranty and life expectancy.

    Maybe my comparison is weird in the sense that it involves two drives with different form factors and different interfaces. There's a significant difference in performance ... :eek: ... but will it be noticeable in real life usage? Im sure it will be noticeable under "heavy load circumstances" but for the "average load", maybe not. Possibly better to go with longer warranty.
     
  11. 2017/12/02
    rsinfo

    rsinfo SuperGeek Alumni

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    I would choose reliability over speed any day. What's a couple of milliseconds between friends ? :)
     
  12. 2017/12/02
    Christer

    Christer Geek Member Staff Thread Starter

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    Well, in this "limping" comparison, there's a significant difference in performance between the 850 and the 960 and that has been proven in benchmarks but do you actually know that it's "milliseconds between friends" in real world usage?

    I have upgraded two systems for friends from SATA HDD to SATA SSD and I don't get overwhelmed by the imrovement in performance. It's noticeable but nothing to run around in circles about.

    I do however have certain expectations with the new interface M.2 (PCIE 3.0 x4/x2) but you have to watch out to get a processor that is "up to it". In terms of AMD socket AM4, if you get a Ryzen, the M.2 slot will run at 32 GB/sec (x4) but if you get an A-series processor, it will run at 16 GB/sec (x2).

    And to all, don't forget to cast your votes!
     
  13. 2017/12/02
    rsinfo

    rsinfo SuperGeek Alumni

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    In real world usage I don't think you would be able to pick out any clear winner among SATA SSD's. They would be closely matched as SATA limitations become apparent above a certain limit.

    Statutory Disclaimer : I don't own a SSD as I don't have the required money. ;)
     
  14. 2017/12/02
    Bill

    Bill SuperGeek WindowsBBS Team Member

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    Not necessarily. Like pretty much all memory devices, densities increase significantly as the technologies advance. So in 5 or 10 years, 10TB SSDs maybe commonplace.
     
  15. 2017/12/02
    Christer

    Christer Geek Member Staff Thread Starter

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    Then I really have got to get a camera and start storing high resolution pictures ... :D ... !
     
    Bill likes this.
  16. 2017/12/02
    Evan Omo

    Evan Omo Computer Support Technician Staff

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    I'd rather have a longer warranty but it honestly depends on what you will be using the computer for. If its just for gaming, office work, streaming etc. then the SATA based SSD will be fast enough for your needs but if you want one of the best drives based on performance benchmarks for your budget then go with the 960 EVO.

    Yes that's true but the 3 year warranty on the M.2 960 SSD is a drawback in case the device fails after the warranty expires.

    As long as you won't be upgrading to a higher capacity SSD in a few years and you don't run low on disk space being used up by all those Windows temporary files. :p
     
  17. 2017/12/03
    Bill

    Bill SuperGeek WindowsBBS Team Member

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    A drawback on paper! The reality is a SSD, even a budget SSD is likely to last long after you retire and replace the computer. Solid state memory components are very robust. And of course, no moving parts like a hard drive. This is why it is almost impossible to find RAM that does not have a lifetime warranty. While not exactly the same technologies, RAM memory devices and SSD memory devices are more alike than different. Again, no moving parts.

    If the 3-year warranty SSD works right out of the box, the odds are in your favor it will serve you well through the life of the computer. Of course, other factors can change all that - an extreme power anomaly comes to mind. Or careless handling by the user (ESD, dropping, stomping on, etc.).
     
  18. 2017/12/03
    retiredlearner

    retiredlearner SuperGeek WindowsBBS Team Member

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    I have a 5 year warranty on my Samsung V-nand SSD 850 EVO and also when the TBW (Total Bytes Written) has been exceeded which is recorded by the Samsung Magician Software.
    The old whichever occurs first story.
     
  19. 2017/12/04
    Bill

    Bill SuperGeek WindowsBBS Team Member

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    But this value is so high, it is highly unlikely it will ever be reached (thanks to wear-leveling). For most users, data is written once compared to being read many times. This is exactly why SSDs are actually ideally suited for page files. See Support and Q&A for Solid-State Drives and scroll down to, "Frequently Asked Questions, Should the pagefile be placed on SSDs?" While the article is getting old, it applies even more so today since wear problems of early generation SSDs are no longer a problem and each new generation of SSD gets better and better.

    I note because that TBW value is so high, and SSD reliability is so good (not to mention power consumption is much lower), more and more data centers are moving to SSDs from hard drives - at least for some of their data.
     

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